Croydon Art Society Annual Exhibition 2018

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

I recently had the honour of being accepted into the Croydon Art Society, one of the oldest and best established in the UK. The Society holds a number of exhibitions through the year and its major Annual Exhibition usually takes place in the Autumn. Provided that my pieces pass the selection I am happy to announce that I will be exhibiting with the Society for the first time this year.

The Croydon Art Society’s Annual Exhibition 2018 will be declared open next Tuesday 20 November at 6.30pm by the Mayor of Croydon herself at the Croydon Clocktower’s Exhibition Gallery in Katherine Street (see map here). The Private View will last until 8pm and you are very welcome to attend. The exhibition will stay open until 8 December with opening times Tue-Sat 10.30am-5pm.

All going well I will be showing two oil on paper landscape paintings which I started at my Haihatus Art Centre residency in Joutsa, Finland, in 2016 and completed in London.


A4 poster for Annual 2018 .jpg
  The Country Lane, Joutsa, Finland, oil on paper, 50x35cm

The Country Lane, Joutsa, Finland, oil on paper, 50x35cm

  The Farm, Joutsa, Finland, oil on paper, 50x35cm

The Farm, Joutsa, Finland, oil on paper, 50x35cm


Source: http://www.croydonartsociety.org/future-ex...

Turf Projects's 5th birthday and open studios, Saturday 20 October

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

Turf Projects, the multi-pronged arts organisation in Croydon where I have my studio will be celebrating its 5th birthday with a full day of activities on Saturday 20 October (full programme here). The artists’ studios at Turf’s main site at Croydon’s Whitgift Centre (map here) will be thrown open from 11am to 5pm for visitors to have a peek around. For personal reasons I won’t be there myself but my work is on display in my studio so if you have any comments or enquiries do please drop me a line!

And don’t miss the afterparty running until 11pm at Turf’s second site on Keeley Road in Croydon and featuring performances, food, drink and music!

Source: http://turf-projects.com/artists-workshops...

London Exhibitions: Dusted Waters, Paintings by Behjat Sadr at the Mosaic Rooms

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

I happened to walk by the Mosaic Rooms in Kensington, the art gallery devoted to contemporary art from Arab countries and the Greater Middle East. I really enjoyed the current exhibition, Dusted Waters (28/09 – 08/12/2018), an exploration of the work and biography of Iranian visual artist Behjat Sadr (1924-2009). Sadr studied Fine Art in Tehran and lived in Rome for some years, exhibiting at the Venice Biennale in 1956 and again in 1962. Later she divided her time between Tehran and Paris, where she settled after the 1979 Iranian Revolution. Among other pieces, the exhibition displays bold abstracts executed in Sadr's signature style, with pure black paint applied with a palette knife on glass and other surfaces, as well as photography which Sadr used as a kind of visual record and which show a very strong sense of the form (Sadr also combined photographs with paint in Modernist collages which I thought were very successful). The exhibition's projection room shows Mitra Farahani's 2006 documentary Behjat Sadr: Time Suspended which includes extensive interviews with the artist.

Having visited Iran last year (including the top notch Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art) I was extremely interested to discover both the Mosaic Rooms and the work of this pioneering creator (Sadr was the first modern female painter to reach the top of her profession in Iran). The Mosaic Rooms also maintain an active programme of talks and events which you can find on the website. Very enjoyable.

  Paintings by Behjat Sadr in Dusted Waters, the Mosaic Rooms

Paintings by Behjat Sadr in Dusted Waters, the Mosaic Rooms

Source: https://mosaicrooms.org/event/behjat_sadr/

Life Drawing sessions at Turf Projects, Croydon, South London

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

Studio holders at Turf Projects in Croydon (including myself) have set up an ongoing series of life drawing sessions and are now opening them up to friends and fellow artists.

The next session is next Tuesday 9th October.

Following that the session dates are:
6th November
20th November
4th December
18th December

It is an informal session with no tutor, just the class working out poses collaboratively with the model, and a studio member keeping time.


The session details are as follows:
£5 cash
7.30-9.30pm
Location: Turf Projects - project space at Keeley Road, Croydon (entrance is at the rear of the Centrale shopping centre, through the loading bay - a useful map can be found here). PLEASE NOTE THAT THE FRONT ENTRANCE TO THE TURF STUDIOS WILL BE CLOSED AND BLACKED OUT TO PROVIDE PRIVACY FOR THE SESSION - PLEASE ARRIVE PROMPTLY BEFORE START AT 7.30. ENTRY WILL BE THROUGH THE BACK OF THE STUDIOS THROUGH THE CENTRALE SHOPPING CENTRE LOADING BAY - WALK INTO THE BAY FROM KEELEY ROAD, TURN LEFT ON THE FIRST CORNER AND KEEP GOING, THE DOOR TO THE STUDIOS WILL BE ON YOUR LEFT!

Please bring your own drawing materials!

The sessions are open to all but, If you plan to come, please email fellow Turf Projects studio holder Jhinuk Sarkar so she can track numbers- Thanks! Jhinuk’s email is Jhinuk@turf-projects.com.


If you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact me or Jhinuk.

Hope to see you there!

Source: http://turf-projects.com/

World Art Museums: Istanbul Modern

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

Istanbul Modern is a public institution founded in 2004 as Turkey's first modern and contemporary art museum. In May 2018 the museum moved to temporary premises in the Galata quarter while a brand-new building is finalised nearby, on the shores of the Bosphorus (completion date for the project is currently given as 2021). The museum currently houses three medium-sized exhibitions:

Anthony Cragg: Human Nature (23/05 – 11/11/2018, by far my favourite of the three) shows sculptures by this British artist (b Liverpool 1949, now based in Germany). Experimental, playful and with a real knack for the form, Cragg presents a diverse selection of modernist sculptures and assemblages in different sizes and materials (from bronze, aluminium and steel to glass and wood). Abstraction with the occasional hint of figuration. Very enjoyable.


  Sculpture by Anthony Cragg

Sculpture by Anthony Cragg

  Sculpture by Anthony Cragg

Sculpture by Anthony Cragg

  Sculpture by Anthony Cragg

Sculpture by Anthony Cragg

Points of View (23/05 – 11/11/2018) presents 25 works from the Istanbul Modern photography collection dating from the 1960s onwards, including by Soviet-born Boris Mikhailov. Very wide range of techniques and approaches.

In Pursuit of the Present is a permanent display of works from the museum collection. Check out the artspeak: ('[The Exhibition] establishes various intersecting and interrelating thematic strands, and, through the works in the exhibition, branches off into side paths such as identity, the body, gender politics, processes of construction and destruction, and the relationship between nature and humans.') The pompous rhetoric accompanies mostly shallow and derivative work. This seems to be the trend in contemporary art.

All in all, well worth a visit if you're in the area.

Source: https://www.istanbulmodern.org/en

Sing, O Goddess, the Wrath, Tasarım Bakkalı residency final solo exhibition, Istanbul [UPDATED]

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

The time is fast approaching for the opening of my solo exhibition Sing, O Goddess, the Wrath, the culmination of a 1-month residency in Istanbul which has been a fantastic experience. You're very welcome to attend the opening next Saturday 1 September 2018 at 7pm at Tasarım Bakkalı (Rasimpaşa Mahallesi, Uzun Hafız Sokak, 101/A Yeldeğirmeni, 34716 Kadiköy, Istanbul, see the Facebook event here and a useful map here), which will probably last for a few hours. Thereafter, the exhibition will remain open Saturdays and Sundays 12-6pm (closed Monday to Friday) until 30 September.

My residency project has developed in a slightly different direction than I initially envisaged. My original intention was to work in the same spirit as in my ongoing Valencia and Dénia series, working from physical and emotional impressions of my surroundings to produce playful abstract and semi-abstract pieces. However, as I started doing research into Turkey's fascinating history I became drawn to an old obsession, the Classical past and Homer's epics The Iliad and The Odyssey. I decided to visit the ancient site of Troy (on the Aegean shore of Turkey, about 250 Km Southwest of Istanbul) as part of my research and the pull towards a project based on the human figure became irresistible. Homer's works are considered to have been inspired by an actual expedition by Mycenaean Greeks against the city of Troy (wealthy because of its strategic location overlooking the Dardanelles strait) around the year 1,200 BC. Part of the fascination of Homer's poems is that they turn abstract historical facts into human drama overflowing with feeling, describing with astonishing lyricism an often shockingly brutal reality.

As I started drawing and writing furiously in my sketchbook and producing studies, the size of these prototypical characters translated into figures of expanding scale in the studio. At that point I took a few days to travel across Western Anatolia to the city of Çanakkale on the Dardanelles and the nearby site of Troy (which was a fantastic experience), as well as to the city of Izmir (ancient Smyrna) and the awesome archaeological site of Ephesus nearby. Since coming back to the studio in Istanbul I've been extremely busy working on the final pieces for the show which have turned out to be on a slightly larger than human scale. It is the deep emotions embodied by Homer's characters that these pieces attempt to come to terms with.

 

  Penelope, compressed charcoal on canvas, 210 x 130 cm

Penelope, compressed charcoal on canvas, 210 x 130 cm

  Ulysses, pigment and glue on canvas, 210 x 130 cm

Ulysses, pigment and glue on canvas, 210 x 130 cm

It is my first visit to Turkey and this month has been absolutely brilliant. Emre and Işıl, the team behind Tasarım Bakkalı, have been running this alternative gallery in the Kadiköy quarter of Istanbul for over three years now and developed the residency programme as the next step forward. They have been amazing hosts and have been incredibly patient and helpful with every aspect of the project and my stay so a massive thanks to them from here.

As part of my project, I diarised the progress of my journey on my Instagram and Facebook accounts.

It is just possible that something else might develop in Turkey as a continuation of the project but as of now it is still a suggestion. Watch this space.

 UPDATE: I am happy to report that (despite last-minute nerves) the exhibition opening was incredibly fun and successful both in terms of attendance (with many new faces, according to Emre and Işıl) and positive feedback on the work. I had memorable conversations with people who had clearly found the project thought-provoking. All in all, a very enjoyable evening. Now that I am back in London I feel incredibly energised for future work.

I was also happy to find out that the exhibition was featured on the website of the large-circulation Turkish newspaper Milliyet.

  Ulysses (pigment and glue on canvas) on the right, Ulysses’s mother Anticleia (compressed charcoal on canvas) on the left, at Tasarım Bakkalı.

Ulysses (pigment and glue on canvas) on the right, Ulysses’s mother Anticleia (compressed charcoal on canvas) on the left, at Tasarım Bakkalı.

  Penelope (compressed charcoal on canvas) on the left, Achaean warrior (pigment and glue on canvas) on the right at Tasarım Bakkalı. Soil from Troy on the foreground.

Penelope (compressed charcoal on canvas) on the left, Achaean warrior (pigment and glue on canvas) on the right at Tasarım Bakkalı. Soil from Troy on the foreground.

  Tasarım Bakkalı in Kadiköy on the opening evening. Emre is first from the right.

Tasarım Bakkalı in Kadiköy on the opening evening. Emre is first from the right.

  The Tasarım Bakkalı studio in Büyükada with my preliminary work.

The Tasarım Bakkalı studio in Büyükada with my preliminary work.


Source: https://www.facebook.com/events/2278826968...

World Art Museums: Pera Museum, Istanbul

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

The Pera Museum in Istanbul is a private institution created by the Suna and Inan Kıraç Foundation in 2005. The chosen venue was the former (and very stylish) Bristol Hotel in the quarter of Beyoğlu (on the European side of the city, North of the Golden Horn and close to the Galata tower). The museum houses a mixture of permanent exhibits and temporary exhibitions. The three permanent exhibits are currently Anatolian Weights and Measures, describing the history of weights and measures in Turkey from the second millennium BC (highlights include a few beautiful astronomical instruments); Osman Hamdi Bey, exploring the life and work of this Ottoman intellectual, high official, art world personality, and painter (1842-1910) who, among other achievements, founded the Istanbul Archaeology Museums and the Istanbul Academy of Fine Arts, the first of its kind in Turkey; Intersecting Worlds, featuring portraits of ambassadors and pieces commissioned by diplomatic officials, either Ottomans abroad or envoys of foreign powers in Istanbul, from the 1600s to the 1800s (lots of historical background here but few outstanding paintings); And Kütahya Tiles and Ceramics Collection, devoted to the history of ceramics production in the city of Kütahya in Western Anatolia.

The first of two current temporary exhibitions is Istanbul's Seaside Leisure (05/04 – 26/08/2018), which looks at the history of public bathing and swimming in the sea in and around Istanbul, once seen as indecent but which by the mid-1900s had become all the rage (and which, ironically, became unfeasible again as the city's population exploded in the following decades). The pioneers of this practice were Russian émigrés after the 1917 revolution, whom disbelieving locals watched parading semi-naked on the beaches, men and women together. Shaken Image (06/06 – 26/08/2018) presents work by graduates of degree and master level Fine Art courses at Hacettepe University in Ankara. I was expecting to scoot through this but, to my amazement, the work here had thought behind it, depth, style, and proper consideration for the form. Maybe (the shock!), in Turkey, Fine Art students are actually, you know, taught something. I never thought I would type these words, but this degree show actually inspired me.

Definitely worth a visit if you are in the area (and check out the cool café!).

  Sculpture by Riza Tan Buğra Özer, Hacettepe University, Ankara

Sculpture by Riza Tan Buğra Özer, Hacettepe University, Ankara

Source: https://www.peramuseum.org/

World Art Museums: The Palace, National Art Gallery of Bulgaria, Sofia

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

The former Royal Palace in central Sofia is now part of Bulgaria's National Gallery of Art and is used as a venue for temporary exhibitions (The National Ethnographic Museum is also located here). The Palace currently hosts three exhibitions:

Nadar's Famous Portraits (21/06 – 26/08/2018) shows beautiful, sensitive photographic portraits of public figures from the mid-1800s taken by French caricaturist, writer and photography pioneer Gaspard-Félix Tournachon, known as Nadar (1820-1910). Nadar's subjects included top artists and intellectuals of the time such as Gustave Courbet, Eugène Delacroix, Émile Zola, Jules Verne, Ivan Turguenev and Victor Hugo, among many others. Very enjoyable.

Mario Zhekov (1898 – 1955) (27/07 – 16/09/2018) presents paintings by this well-known Bulgarian painter, mainly landscapes, cityscapes and urban scenes painted in Bulgaria, Istanbul, Paris and the Adriatic coast. On the traditional side, to me the most enjoyable paintings were those in which the use of paint was boldest, with thick impasto and strong colour contrasts. Also very nice drawings and watercolours which I generally enjoyed more than the paintings.

Portraits by Zlatyu Boyadzhiev (19/05 – 31/12/2018) is a one-room display of portraits by Boyadzhiev (1903-1976), a figurative painter well known in Bulgaria and influenced by Renaissance art who suffered a devastating brain stroke in 1951. Unable to use his right hand, he learnt to paint from scratch with his left. The Zlatyu Boyadhiev Gallery, devoted to the work of the painter, has been open to the public since 1984 in the town of Plovdiv. The intense paintings in this display span the artist's career.

 

  Zlaytu Boyadzhiev, Female Portrait (1932)

Zlaytu Boyadzhiev, Female Portrait (1932)

Source: http://nationalgallery.bg/visiting/the-pal...

World Art Museums: Museum of Socialist Art, National Art Gallery of Bulgaria, Sofia

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

From visiting Bulgaria, it is clear that the debate about the Socialist past was very intense after the fall of the Berlin wall in 1989 and still rages today. The Museum of Socialist Art in Sofia opened its doors in 2011 and is now part of the National Gallery of Art. The museum functions partly as a venue for temporary exhibitions.

At present, the museum's permanent exhibits consist of a series of official propaganda films and news reels from the Communist era shown in the museum store/ticket office/projection room (mainly celebrating the social, economic and political achievements of the Communist regime) plus the over 70 sculptural pieces displayed in the park outside the building. Besides the several Lenins here there are portraits of prominent Communist leaders like Georgi Dimitrov, Prime Minister of the country from 1946 until his death in 1949. There are also many celebratory depictions of ordinary workers and allegorical representations of Bulgaria and the Bulgarian republic. The prevailing style is the blocky expressionism known as Socialist Realism, which (call me a dinosaur), with its severe, old-fashioned stylishness probably speaks to me more than much of contemporary sculpture.

The park is also home to the huge red star that used to top the spire of the headquarters of the Bulgarian Communist Party in central Sofia (the building now houses administrative offices of the Bulgarian Parliament and is crowned by the national flag).

The current temporary exhibition, The New Political Poster (18/05 – 28/10/2018) appears to be a display of student-designed posters on a handful of set themes (from the centenary of the October Revolution to the Prague Spring to populism). This is interesting work but, frustratingly, not much information is given. A contemporary sculpture piece in the park (Reconstruction as Tragedy and Farce, by Peter Sadofski and Dan Trantina from the Czech collective Pode Bal, 04/07 – 30/09/2018) looks at the death of an East German citizen as he tried to cross the border between Czechoslovakia and Austria in 1986.

 

  Nedko Krasnev and Nikolina Karanova, Giorgi Dimitrov (1949)

Nedko Krasnev and Nikolina Karanova, Giorgi Dimitrov (1949)

Source: http://nationalgallery.bg/visiting/museum-...

World Art Museums: Kvadrat 500, National Gallery of Bulgaria, Sofia

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

The several museums in Sofia belonging to the National Gallery of Bulgaria have been reorganised in recent times. Of these, the largest by far is Kvadrat 500, resulting from the combination in 2014 of the former Gallery of Foreign Art (a beautiful Neoclassical building in central Sofia, facing the St Alexander Nevski cathedral) and the adjacent building previously belonging to the Technical University.

Kvadrat 500 is a huge museum mainly displaying Bulgarian and European painting and sculpture from the mid-1800s onwards, with a group of older European works. Each of the four levels of the building is in itself the size of a small museum. My friends in Bulgaria tell me that the Kvadrat 500 project was heavily criticised on grounds of cost, but to my mind the collection presented here is consistently of a very high quality and provides a great introduction to Bulgarian art from the last 150 years.

It is interesting to note that there are very few purely abstract works here, maybe because, as I understand it, the prevailing official line in Eastern European Communist countries discouraged abstraction. By contrast, every conceivable experiment in figurative painting up to the 1990s seems to be documented here. Besides portraiture and traditional painting genres, Bulgarian painters felt the influence of Impressionism and early Modernists like Paris-based George Papazov (1894-1972) experimented with abstraction. Nationalist painters of the 1920s and 30s like Vladimir Dimitrov 'The Master' (1882-1960) used bold figurative codes with the life of the ordinary Bulgarian people as their subject matter. From then on, in the decades before and after the start of the Communist era in 1944, figurative artists explored every possible avenue and trend.

My one criticism of the museum is that not enough guidance is provided to follow the intentions of the artists represented here. The A4-size information sheets (one per room, in Bulgarian and English) are helpful but information could be presented in a more engaging and visitor-friendly way. The visit is generally in chronological order but, often, work from different tendencies or separated by decades is found in the same room. One is left with a huge ensemble of very high-quality works which perhaps have not been made sufficiently accessible.

Separately, the museum also houses an extensive (and very interesting) collection of traditional sculpture, arts and crafts from Africa, India, Japan, SE Asia and the Americas acquired in the last decades of the 20th century.

A highly recommended visit if you're in Sofia and a great chance to get acquainted with the work of first-rate artists whom you may not encounter anywhere else.

 

  Vladimir Dimitrov, Women Hoers (1937)

Vladimir Dimitrov, Women Hoers (1937)

  Vera Ivanova, Female Nude (1930)

Vera Ivanova, Female Nude (1930)

  Masha Zhikova, Nude (1941)

Masha Zhikova, Nude (1941)

  Endre Domanovszky, Morning (c 1965)

Endre Domanovszky, Morning (c 1965)

  Angel Hristov, The Burnt Down House (1989)

Angel Hristov, The Burnt Down House (1989)

Source: http://nationalgallery.bg/visiting/kvadrat...

London Exhibitions: Picasso 1932 at Tate Modern

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

I'm not the biggest fan of Picasso's work (it tends to leave me cold) but the current exhibition at Tate Modern is incredibly informative and thought-provoking and probably a must if you have any interest in 20th century art.

The exhibition focuses on Picasso's (truly phenomenal) output in just one year, 1932. Picasso had just turned fifty and had long been well-established and wealthy, but critics apparently questioned whether he was still capable of producing truly groundbreaking work. He had been married to Russian dancer Olga Khoklova since 1918 but had been in a (supposedly) secret relationship with the much younger Marie Thérèse Walter since around 1927, and it is Walter's likeness that appears in many of the paintings in the exhibition (Picasso often painted the female figure, not from life, but recognisably inspired by one or another of his romantic interests). Picasso was also working towards his first major retrospective in Paris in June of that year, which must have provided some extra motivation to prove himself (even though he was in full control of the exhibition, Picasso famously refused to attend the opening and went to the cinema instead).

Whatever you think of Picasso's art (I personally think he was more interested in experimenting formally than in truly speaking from his heart), the Tate exhibition proves his undeniable boldness and creative energy. Also (and whilst being no expert in Picasso's oeuvre), I felt that the selection of work brought together for this exhibition (and drawing from a broad variety of formats and techniques -drawing, painting and sculpture) is consistently strong.

Finishes 9 September.

 

  Picasso, Reclining Nude (1932)

Picasso, Reclining Nude (1932)

Source: https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-mode...

London Exhibitions: Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One at Tate Britain

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

World War I was obviously an almighty shock to European countries on every level, social and political. Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One tries to make sense of the response of artists to the war and its reverberations into the following decades.

With such a broad brief it's perhaps no wonder that the exhibition, moving from Allied and German soldier artists and war memorials to the Bauhaus in just eight rooms, feels a bit unfocused. Still there's plenty of food for thought here and lots of iconic artworks, from CRW Nevinson's 1917 Paths of Glory to George Grosz's and Otto Dix's expressionist depictions of shell-shocked, post-war German society and Oskar Schlemmer's abstracted figures from the 1930s. 

One of the rooms that impressed me the most was the one devoted to series of prints commenting on the war and its horrific consequences. Great examples here are Otto Dix's 1924 Der Krieg (The War), Max Beckmann's 1919 Die Hölle (Hell), and Käthe Kollwitz's 1922 Krieg (Kollwitz was an first-rate printmaker and an anti-war socialist who lost her youngest son Peter at the front in October 1914).

Well worth visiting if you can spare the time. Finishes 23 September.

 

  Käthe Kollwitz, Die Eltern (The Parents), from Krieg, woodcut, 1921/22

Käthe Kollwitz, Die Eltern (The Parents), from Krieg, woodcut, 1921/22

Source: https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-brit...

London Exhibitions: Dorothea Lange / Vanessa Winship at the Barbican

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

Another one in a series of smashing photography exhibitions at the Barbican. Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) became a successful portrait photographer in San Francisco before the Great Depression of the 1930s turned her attention towards capturing the tough life of the poor and unemployed in the city streets. Starting in 1935, the US Government's Resettlement Administration (later the Farm Security Administration, FSA) ran its well-known photography programme in order to make the American public aware of the plight of rural workers and families affected, not just by the depression, but by the dust storms and drought (the 'Dust Bowl') that blighted many areas of the central US at the time. The programme hired photographers of the calibre of Lange and Walker Evans whose work became a landmark in the history of documentary photography in the 20th century. The Barbican exhibition presents this and subsequent aspects of Lange's photography including her work on Japanese Americans interned during World War II and her visit to rural Ireland in 1954.

The second part of the exhibition presents the work of contemporary photographer Vanessa Winship (born 1960). Winship's work is compelling and varied but, to my mind, does not quite match the focus and appeal of Lange's.

Definite recommend to anyone with any interest at all in photography. Finishes 2 September.

 

  Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother (1936)

Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother (1936)

Source: https://www.barbican.org.uk/whats-on/2018/...

Tasarim Bakkali artist's residency in Istanbul in August

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

Very exciting news- I have accepted into the Tasarim Bakkali artist in residency programme in Istanbul (see also here and here) for the month of August. The programme provides accommodation and studio space, with a solo exhibition in the Kadiköy quarter of Istanbul at the end of the residency period.

My plan for the stay is to develop the strand within my practice in which I respond very freely and intuitively to my immediate surroundings (landscapes, cityscapes, the urban environment...) or the ideas and associations waken by those surroundings. This is the case of my Valencia and Dénia series, examples from which can be seen in the Landscapes and Cityscapes section of my website.

 

  Zaimov Park, Sofia, Bulgaria, conté carré on paper (2017)

Zaimov Park, Sofia, Bulgaria, conté carré on paper (2017)

  Charcoal study, from the Valencia series (2016)

Charcoal study, from the Valencia series (2016)

  Rooftops Study IV, from the Valencia series, pastel and chalk on paper (2016)

Rooftops Study IV, from the Valencia series, pastel and chalk on paper (2016)

I am currently doing as much research as possible in order to optimise the use of time once I get to Istanbul. I plan to diarise my experience on my Instagram account and I will post more details about the progress of the project and the final exhibition here.

Incredibly excited about this opportunity.

Source: http://www.tasarimbakkali.cc/

New artist's page on Saatchi Art

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

Selected pieces from my portfolio are now available for purchase on Saatchi Art, the veteran online art gallery. Registration is free and according to the reviews I have read the site is glitch-free and user-friendly (for both sellers and collectors) and that has been my experience so far. In the event of a sale, pieces are picked up and delivered by courier and clear packaging instructions are provided to the artist.

The site hosts an extremely broad variety of work and offers artists the chance to connect with each other.

My work is also available for purchase on the equally well-established Degree Art, where I have made a number of sales, and The Hornshaw Gallery.

For more info please do not hesitate to contact me.

 

  South Downs I, 42x30cm, oil on paper, available on my Saatchi Art page

South Downs I, 42x30cm, oil on paper, available on my Saatchi Art page

  South Downs II, 42x30cm, oil on paper, available on my Saatchi Art page

South Downs II, 42x30cm, oil on paper, available on my Saatchi Art page

  South Downs III, 42x30cm, oil on paper, available on my Saatchi Art page

South Downs III, 42x30cm, oil on paper, available on my Saatchi Art page

Source: https://www.saatchiart.com/miguelsopena

Selected for Town Hall Arts' Town Hall Open 2018

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

Good news! One of my abstract studies has been selected for the Town Hall Open exhibition 2018 organised by Town Hall Arts in Trowbridge, Wiltshire.

Selected works will be exhibited for nearly two months over the Summer, from 21 July to 15 September, at Trowbridge Town Hall (Market Street, Trowbridge, BA14 8EQ, a useful map can be found here ) The official opening will take place on Saturday 21 July 12-2pm and you are all very welcome to attend (pls RSVP if you plan to do so).

I created this piece by mixing impasto medium with oil paint and focusing purely on enjoying the play of colour and texture. Whether in figurative or abstract painting I am very attracted to the qualities of paint as a material medium and I look forward to revisiting this way of working in the future.

 

  Nebula, oil and impasto medium on paper, 42x30 cm (2015)

Nebula, oil and impasto medium on paper, 42x30 cm (2015)

 

 

Source: http://www.trowbridgearts.com/index.php?op...

Dulwich Art Group's annual exhibition

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

It was great to exhibit work as part of the Dulwich Art Group's yearly exhibition, which was held on the weekend of 12-13 May as part of Dulwich Festival in South London.

The PV was held on Saturday evening and was a great success, with the group's life drawing room-turned-exhibition-space absolutely packed with visitors. 

The Dulwich Art Group has a very active programme of life drawing sessions through the week and has been expanding its activities lately, with added drawing sessions as well as figurative painting and drawing courses and workshops. The group's focus is mainly on figurative painting and drawing so that was also the predominant strand of work in the exhibition. About forty artists took part.

You can see full details of the group's activity on the group's website.

 

  self-portrait, 75x50 cm, oil on canvas (preselected, BP Portrait Award 2016)

self-portrait, 75x50 cm, oil on canvas (preselected, BP Portrait Award 2016)

Source: http://www.dulwichartgroup.co.uk/