London Exhibitions: Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One at Tate Britain

Added on by Miguel Sopena.

World War I was obviously an almighty shock to European countries on every level, social and political. Aftermath: Art in the Wake of World War One tries to make sense of the response of artists to the war and its reverberations into the following decades.

With such a broad brief it's perhaps no wonder that the exhibition, moving from Allied and German soldier artists and war memorials to the Bauhaus in just eight rooms, feels a bit unfocused. Still there's plenty of food for thought here and lots of iconic artworks, from CRW Nevinson's 1917 Paths of Glory to George Grosz's and Otto Dix's expressionist depictions of shell-shocked, post-war German society and Oskar Schlemmer's abstracted figures from the 1930s. 

One of the rooms that impressed me the most was the one devoted to series of prints commenting on the war and its horrific consequences. Great examples here are Otto Dix's 1924 Der Krieg (The War), Max Beckmann's 1919 Die Hölle (Hell), and Käthe Kollwitz's 1922 Krieg (Kollwitz was an first-rate printmaker and an anti-war socialist who lost her youngest son Peter at the front in October 1914).

Well worth visiting if you can spare the time. Finishes 23 September.

 

  Käthe Kollwitz, Die Eltern (The Parents), from Krieg, woodcut, 1921/22

Käthe Kollwitz, Die Eltern (The Parents), from Krieg, woodcut, 1921/22

Source: https://www.tate.org.uk/whats-on/tate-brit...